Sunday, February 3, 2013

Eileen Roche's Blog Tour Stop Feb 6th

We're an official Blog Stop ~ Feb 6, 2013

Pin-It 2 Win-It & Comment for a FREE autographed copy of Eileen Roche's new book!

How to enter to win:  Complete 1 & 2 below to enter the contest and you may be the lucky one to win "Machine Embroidery in 6 Easy Lessons!"


  1. Pin It or Share It on either your Pinterest Page, or Facebook page AND
  2. Ask Eileen Roche a question about machine embroidery in the "comments section". 

Contest Deadlines:  Feb 3-Feb 14, 2013.

Anyone new to machine embroidery or need a refresher in embroidery placement, stabilizers or hooping aides?  This is a great reference book for anyone who loves to embroider.

Post a comment for Eileen using "comments" below & don't forget you must Pin-In or Share on your Facebook page in order to qualify.

***Please leave email address or contact info in case you win (if you do not have a google act, then you will show up as anonymous and we won't have any way to contact you.)

90 comments:

  1. So pleased to meet you through Hope Yoder! I can't wait to check out your new book, whether I win or not, and have pinned it for future reference. My e-mail address is egrantva@aol.com.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please ask Eileen a question to qualify.

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    2. How big should lettering be on a pillowcase hem?

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    3. There's no real set of rules for pillowcases, just personal preference. measure the height of the hem (from the edge to the hemstitching). Subtract 1 1/2" from that number to allow for 3/4" open space above and below the lettering. Center the lettering in the hem - both vertically and horizontally.

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    4. At what point is it better to use a fill stitch vs. a satin stitch?

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  2. I would love to win this book. Looking forward to seeing the book, whether I win it or not. Thank you for making it available. Email address: tat1950@live.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please ask Eileen a question and share our link on either Pinterst of Facebook to qualify.

      Delete
  3. Future entries, please ask Eileen Roche a question about machine embroidery rather than letting us know you would love to win. We hope to make this a great resource for asking the expert, Eileen, questions you need answers to regarding machine embroidery, hooping, placement etc.

    Post your questions for Eileen in the comment section and don't forget you MUST Pin our blog to your Pinterest Page or share this blog on your Facebook Page in order to qualify.

    Can't wait to see all your questions and read Eileen's answers.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Are you going to be having any workshops/classes in the Washington,DC area? Would LOVE to take a class!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! My Stitching Sister, Marie Zinno, and I are teaching in Crofton, MD on April 12-13 at Tomorrow's Treasures. Hope to see you there!

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    2. How about the Dallas-Ft Worth area?

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  5. Need help stablizing t shirts for embroider.
    covan13@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Use a fusible polymesh stabilizer on the wrong side of a t-shirt. Make sure the stabilizer if larger than the hoop and completely captured in the hoop. Add a film-type of water soluble stabilizer on top.

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  6. Yes! My Stitching Sister, Marie Zinno & I are headed to Tomorrow's Treasures in Crofton, MD on April 12-13, 2013. Hope to see you there!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I am always debating whether to hoop fabric or use an adhesive stabilizer and just hoop that. Is there a good rule or 2 about when to hoop and when not to?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You will get the best stabilization on fabric when it is hooped in a standard hoop with stabilizer. That should be your first goal. If that's not attainable, explore other options like adhesive stabilizer, temporary spray adhesive or a hoop insert such as Magna Hoop.

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  8. Would using a program such as Density Works help with adjusting the stitch density of machine embroidery patterns? Am always having issues with needle popping even though I use two layers of either a cutaway or tearaway, in addition to an iron fusible mesh.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think your problem may be too much stabilizer! Three layers of stabilizer is overkill. Test your design with one layer (as general rule: cut-away for knits, tear-away for wovens). If the design is too dense or puckering occurs, decrease the density and try again. You really shouldn't have 'needles popping.'

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    2. Hi Agnes,

      YOU ARE OUR WINNER! CONGRATULATIONS!!! Please email hope@hopeyoder.com with your shipping information and your phone number and contact info so we can send you your copy of Eileen's book!!!

      www.HopeYoder.com

      Delete
  9. My question is what are your favorite things for to embroider that are easy gifts? Another question is: What are some great embroidered gift ideas for men that don't take too long to do?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jenn - my go to gift is towels! Even for men - single men love receiving monogrammed towels because it's an item that wouldn't think of getting for themselves. For married men, a monogrammed shirt (sleeve cuff) is a very personal touch. Also, one more item: embroidered ipad (or the like) sleeve.

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  10. !!!!EILEEN Would luv to see your book would buy right away...i also have trouble embroidery on T-Shirts....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I told Jennette above: Use a fusible polymesh stabilizer on the wrong side of a t-shirt. Make sure the stabilizer if larger than the hoop and completely captured in the hoop. Add a film-type of water soluble stabilizer on top.

      Delete
  11. Do you use different types of thread when embroidering besides embroidery thread? If so do you have any good tips?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laurie, I've experimented with cotton thread with success but I 99% of the time, I use poly or rayon. I would suggest testing the design and thread before embarking on the project and cleaning the bobbin case after every design.

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  12. What is the proper placement for a design on a child's t-shirt? I'm always afraid I don't have it placed correctly from the neckline. I don't have a problem with centering it from the sides usually. Thank you so much for sharing your expertise! My email is bailey_smith_1999@yahoo.com.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That changes from each size but the top of the design should be about 1 1/2" below the neckline edge on toddlers.

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  13. What type of stabilizers do you recommend for most of your designs?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My general rule is cut-away for knits, tear-away for wovens.

      Delete
  14. Can I use my cording foot and a redwork design to couch a decorative braid on a project?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well...I'm known for pushing the envelope when it comes to technique but I don't think this one would work because an embroidery foot just kisses the fabric, it does not sit down on the fabric. A cording foot sits directly on the fabric so I think you encounter fabric tunneling when using a cording foot. Check with your machine manufacturer, there maybe a cording foot available for your embroidery unit. Or....tape a drinking straw above the needle and guide the cording through it. I've done that with limited success because when the needle hoops moves backwards the cord gets all tangled.

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  15. What would you consider to be the three to five most important supplemental "tools" that all machine embroiderers should own? They could be considered the "save the day"/"time savers" of any embroiderer's tool box. All professionals have their "tricks of the trade." Recognizing your expertise, please share what you believe to be the supplemental "must-haves." Thanks so much, Judy
    Email> oujayma@cox.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Painter's tape, target stickers, temporary spray adhesive, PAL2 and Snap Hoop. I can do anything with those five tools.

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    2. Hi Eileen,

      When doing applique embroidery, do you do anything special to the fabric to adhere it to the blank so that it remains "stuck" down.

      Karen

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  16. I dislike having a piece of iron on it other stabilizer on the back of tee shirt or polo styled shirts. It tends to show thru as many shirts are so thin today. It also makes the front stiff and plastic looking.

    Is there a way to use a wash away or iron away on tee shirts? I am not thinking about very dense embroideries.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely. For very sheer shirts and lightweight designs, I use a water soluble adhesive stabilizer. I've recently learned that spraying liquid starch on the wrong side of the shirt before applying the adhesive stabilizer, helps in the removal of the adhesive stabilizer. The starch is a barrier to the 'gunky' stabilizer.

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  17. What advise do you have about digitizing logos that are completely filled circles, and they don't want to make them an applique patch. They want the whole logo to be sewn onto a polo shirt. How much pull compensation do you recommend for a complex design in a 3 1/2" circle to get it to stitch out as fairly close to a circle?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marlys, you're question is out of my league! I'm not a digitizer. Sorry.

      Delete
  18. I embroider on onesies (bodysuits) a lot. Is ironing on stabilizer the best for such small items? The stabilizer would be on the entire width of the onesie on some sizes. Also, what brand of iron on stabilizer do you recommend?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I press fusible cut-away polymesh stabilizer to the wrong side of a onesie filling the width of the front. After stitching, I apply heat to the stabilizer again and lift the polymesh. When hot, the adhesive is melted and easily releases from the fabric. I trim the stabilizer about 1/4" beyond the embroidery. It is good practice to add a fusible knit interfacing over the back of the embroidery so that the garment is comfortable on newborn's skin.

      Delete
  19. Eileen,
    WHen embroidering pillowcases with a monogram, in which direction should the monogram face?
    Barbara Hedrick
    bhed52@bellsouth.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My preference is to stitch the monogram so that it reads from the bottom up. On the pillow case on the right side of the bed, the monogram for Hope Yoder will have the H on the left (the bottom) and Y on the right (the top), parallel with the pillow case edge.

      Delete
  20. Do you plan to do any other classes @ Sew Special Studios in Woodbridge, Va, in the near (or far) future? I really learned a lot when you where there in the past. How do I visualize placement on anything? I think I know where I want it but after hooping it & stitching, it's not exactly where I wanted it.
    athorstad@verizon.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am hosting an embroidery & embellishing conference at Sew Special Studio on Feb 21, 22, 23. Here is the link http://www.sewspecialstudio.com/events/577/

      Delete
    2. The best way to visualize placement is to print a template of the embroidery design from embroidery software. Place the template on the garment and critique the placement. Templates are a terrific planning aid.

      Delete
  21. Dear Eileen,
    I would like to embroider my trade name, continuously, on a 5/8" ribbon.
    How should I position the ribbon in the hoop?
    Thank you for your help.
    Kind regards,
    Aurore Stubbs
    aurorejohn@tds.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, that's a very narrow space. I would hoop tear-away stabilizer (assuming the ribbon is grosgrain or cotton twill), draw a long vertical line on the hooped stabilizer. Spray the wrong side of the ribbon with temporary adhesive and finger press it to the hooped stabilizer. Stitch the design. With careful planning, you can stitch many repeats of the trade name on the one piece of hooped stabilizer. Start at one side, stitch, carefully tear away and then draw another line. Repeat. Don't place each length of ribbon too close to the one before it (the hole). Gee...hope this makes sense. I can see it but maybe not explain it as clearly as I'd like to!

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    2. Dear Eileen,

      Thank you very much for your advice.
      I fully understand your explanation, which makes sense to me.
      I will make a sample run and I will let you know.
      Thank you again for your help and please, thank Hope for giving us the opportunity to ask you how to fix our embroidering problems.
      Kind regards to both of you,
      Aurore Stubbs
      aurorejohn@tds.net

      Delete
  22. Hi Eileen,
    I want to make patches, but I haven't seen any instructions on how to make embroidered patches that will then be sewn onto garments. Can you help?
    Thanks,
    msnancy@suwanee.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No I really can't. Believe it or not, I've never stitched a patch.

      Delete
    2. OESD has a package (like you buy for stabilizer) that says right on it For Patches. I would go to the OESD website and look for patches in their "search" box. Hope this helps.

      Delete
  23. Eileen, I would appreciate any advice you can give on hooping and embroidering on a onesie. Many thanks,

    Joyce

    jfrustillo@hotmail.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I press fusible cut-away polymesh stabilizer to the wrong side of a onesie filling the width of the front. After stitching, I apply heat to the stabilizer again and lift the polymesh. When hot, the adhesive is melted and easily releases from the fabric. I trim the stabilizer about 1/4" beyond the embroidery. It is good practice to add a fusible knit interfacing over the back of the embroidery so that the garment is comfortable on newborn's skin.

      Delete
  24. What is the easiest way to line up a design on a t-shirt?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For left chest embroidery, I use Embroiderer's Helper. For center chest embroidery, I fold the shirt in half and press the fold. Then I place the shirt underthe laser crosshair of PAL2 and align the crease, the hoop and laser. Perfectly square, every time.

      Delete
  25. Lots of good questions, I have trouble with t-shirts also, I recently did a fish shirt and it was very dense embroidery, I used sticky in the hoop and just the t-shirt on top , after I washed it and it came out wrinkly. So I should have hooped it or used the polymesh you mentioned. What brand is that? Does it matter?

    Thank you,
    Sandy
    sjvalvoda@msn.com

    ReplyDelete
  26. My modest opinion, when I do t-shirts for my grandchildren I put underneath the cut-away a floating stabilizer like tear easy, and on top the sulky that disolves, and the stitches stay on top, then I get a bottle of water with a spray nozzle and it disappears. But before I embroider, I do wash it and dry on the washer & dryer. No puckers!

    If I win, I would love to know how to use all the gizmos I purchased from Eileen, they are fantastic, but I could only learn seeing. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll find clear, step-by-step photos in the book for using the tools and we have tons of videos on youtube. Just search Eileen Roche - you'll find them!

      Delete
  27. Pinned...
    Hi Eileen! Now that I am doing more embroidery I am being asked by friends and family to embroider things for them. Do you have a pricing system that could help me to know what to charge for items I embroider? I am still learning the industry and currently will only embroider on things I make.
    Thank you!
    Lynn Leusch - stampinlynn@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good for you! I've never had to develop a pricing system so I don't have any experience in this area. I suggest heading over to industry expert, Deborah Jones at www.myembroiderymentor.com I think she has pricing info on her site. Good luck with your new venture!

      Delete
  28. suggestion for embroidery on a neoprene material... with the stretching sometimes it doesn't come out so good any other tips?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Eliminate the stretch on neoprene with polymesh cut-away stabilizer. The act of fusing the polymesh to the neoprene might harm the neoprene so spray the polymesh with temporary adhesive and adhere the neoprene to the stabilizer. You shouldn't have any trouble.

      Delete
  29. I am new to machine embroidery....can you do a design on burlap?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As a newcomer to embroidery, I suggest starting with fabric that is more stable than burlap. What we love about burlap is its gnarly surface - all it's bumps, openings, twisted yarns and such. It's a challenge to tame that with luscious delicate embroidery threads. But it can be done. Select a design with fill stitches - little open work and use a topper to create a base for the stitches. Water soluble stabilizer (film-type) will work.

      Delete
  30. Stabilizers there seems like there are so many how do you decide what to use and when....just seems overwhelming....help please! Cvandaalwyk@new.rr.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree - there are many choices! Always approach an embroidery project with common sense. Knit fabrics are unstable - they stretch! So control them with a cut-away. Wovens are more stable and tear-away stabilizer is sufficient. Sheer fabrics require stabilizer that can be permanently removed by water or heat, fiber content will tell you what direction to take.

      Big, bulky impossible to hoop items need a stabilizer that will hold them under the needle - think adhesives here. Don't be overwhelmed, use common sense and know that there are no stabilizer police. If it worked for you, then it's fine!

      Delete
    2. Hi Cathy,
      You are the winner. Please contact us via email hope@hopeyoder.com to give us your contact info and shipping address.

      Delete
  31. Alignment is one of my problems, I measure and remeasure, mark the "spot" with a target sticker of erasable marking pen, hoop it and then wonder out loud "is this the right spot"? Will my machine start where I have the marked spot? Thank you. jeanlowenberger@sastel.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Make sure your needle is positioned in the center of the sewing field. Some machines give you an option of selecting a different starting point but most machines have the needle centered in the sewing field/hoop. Once your fabric is hooped with the target sticker in place, position the needle in the center of the target sticker. When you remove the sticker and stitch the design, it will land where you planned.

      You may need to rotate the design if your target sticker is not square to the hoop.

      Delete
  32. When embroidering on knits do you always use an iron on stabilizer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nine times out of 10, I fuse poly mesh cut-away stabilizer to the wrong side of a knit. If the knit is quite sheer, I use a water soluble adhesive stabilizer.

      Delete
  33. I have trouble with the fabric "puckering" around filled embroidery designs (using stabilizer)....any suggestions on how to avoid this?

    pdlduck06@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  34. What tips do you have for lining up a multi-hoop design?

    Thanks, Hope, for giving us this opportunity to pick Eileen's brain!

    ReplyDelete
  35. It's difficult to analyze a problem without seeing the fabric and design but it sounds like the item was not hooped taut or it could be the design is too dense for the fabric and the fabric is being pulled into the design leaving puckers beyond the edge of the embroidery. Do another test hooping taut. If trouble still lurks, adjust the density of the design in software. If you don't have software, switch to a firmer or fused stabilizer.

    ReplyDelete
  36. As a newbie at machine embroidery I bought a roll of tear away stabilizer to practise with. But the more I read, and the more patterns I look at, I realize that I need a variety of stabilizers. Can you tell me what basic stabilizers I should start with, and then what I will need as a second tier? I am interested in making your bags, doing applique, and I am signed up for your embroidered quilt class on Craftsy, although I haven't started it yet! There is so much to learn and I love your blog. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Basic supplies include tear-away in two weights: lightweight (which is crisp and tears clean; perfect for free-standing applique)) and medium weight (soft with fibers extending beyond the embroidery when torn) and cut-away stabilizer (polymesh) which you'll use on knits. Beyond that, you'll need three water soluble stabilizers: regular weight film type most often used as a topper; cloth type - perfect for lace and a water soluble adhesive.

      Glad to hear you joined my Craftsy class - it's a great learning platform!

      Delete
  37. I am new to machine embroidery and commenting on bloodspots! My question is how do you know if a font has a double underlay which was referred to on the segment I watched on Sewing with Nancy with Eileen as guest.

    ReplyDelete
  38. I would like to embroider on fleece and Minkee. What stabilizer should I use and do I need to do anything else special for these fabrics?
    Thank you so much!
    Susan
    pandagram@hughes.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jump over to my blog - I did a whole post on embroidering on Minkee. You'll find all the information you need. http://dzgns.com/blog/2012/02/how-to-embroider-on-minky/

      Delete
  39. Eileen, I've got a problem with aligning endless embroider designs on hemlines and around edges of items like tableclothes, etc. I've tried used templates and lining up the little stich markes my machine makes, but I still can't get it right. No one really seems to notice but me, but I'd really like to kick this problem to the curb.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hi Eileen, On children and babies clothing do you iron on a cut away mesh stabelizer over the embroidery so it doesn't scratch their skin, if not what do you use to keep the inside soft?
    I would love to win one of your new books, if its anything like your other books, and I'm sure it is, I am sure it's FANTASTIC! YES I WANT!!!!
    keepingunstitches@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  41. I have shared a link and would love to win this book. I love your work, especially the quilting. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  42. Hi Eileen, My problem is lining up continuous designs that have to be rehooped more than once. I can never get the design lined up to perfection & it always bothers me. Is there any tips? I noticed you mentioned painters tape in another answer. I might give that a try.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Eileen, I enjoy all the knowledge you share on your blog. How do I decide when to hoop just the stabilizer versus hooping the stabilizer and fabric/item?

    ReplyDelete
  44. Hello Eileen. I am new to machine embroidery. Will this help me with placement on ready made items as well as on clothing I sew?
    Thanks!
    Robyn
    roybns55@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  45. I thought I had posted previously, but don't see thee comment.

    My question: When do you change your needle? Number of stitches? How can I tell when it's time?

    ReplyDelete
  46. I was able to meet Eileen at Quilt Show this past November and love watching her on Sewing with Nancy and reading her blog. I would like to know what is the one stabilizer that you could not live without. I know that you and Nancy recommend having several kinds but if you had to keep just one what would it be?

    ReplyDelete
  47. Eileen and Marie - Thank you so much for the wonderful experience of attending your Sewing Sisters event in San Marcos. You combined so much into the session. We learned a lot of new techniques, received information on new products and also had a lot of laughs with two sisters who obviously love each other.

    Quick question - We created a key fob but unfortunately, did not receive the designs/instructions for creating one at home on the CD you provided. Would it be possible to receive the designs/instructions after-the-fact?

    Thank you again for a great time and your generosity in sharing your time, stories, and talent with us.

    Sharon Schroeder

    ReplyDelete
  48. How can I keep my projects from puckering?

    ReplyDelete
  49. This article gives us a good insight about. Highly appreciated, very thoughtful. DigitEMB

    ReplyDelete

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